Peyton Manning visits Miami to help Ryan Tannehill learn Gase’s offense

“At that time, we weren’t able to meet with the coaches or anything, so I didn’t really have a great handle yet,” Tannehill said. “So I wasn’t really able to dive into the playbook too much. So I had a few questions (for Manning). If he comes back now, we can have a completely different conversation.”

Tannehill also said he was able to glean from their work together that Manning “respects Adam. The things they did, getting to a Super Bowl together, there is a mutual respect there. He is something I aspire to be, as good or better as he is one day. Hopefully, we’ll be able to get him to come around some more.”

It seems pretty doubtful that Tannehill will ever be as good as Manning (that’s a pretty high bar to clear), but the Dolphins would probably settle for simply “better than last year” anyway. If Manning and/or Gase can help him get there, that’s great.

The Dallas Cowboys are moving. Like most moves, it’ll be a costly one. Unlike most moves, the final price tag will total $1.5 billion.

Starting next season, the Cowboys’ practice facility will no longer be based at Valley Ranch. Instead, the team will be relocating over to a Frisco-based facility called The Star. Apparently, The Star, once it’s finished, will cost more than the construction of AT&T Stadium — the gold standard of all stadiums.

Again, The Star will cost $1.5 billion!

Rumble Ponies: A tribute to the Triple Cities’ rich carousel heritage, the Rumble Ponies is a herd of fierce horses that no carousel center pole can contain.

Stud Muffins: While tipping a cap to the players on the field, the Stud Muffins celebrates the collection of carousel horses belonging to Binghamtonians.

It’s worth noting most attempts to rehab a partial tear fail and the pitcher ultimately needs Tommy John surgery anyway. Matt Harvey, Chad Billingsley, Drew Hutchisonand Francisco Liriano are among those who attempted to rehab partial tears only to need Tommy John in recent years.

That said, the rehab approach has worked. Most notably, Masahiro Tanakasuccessfully rehabbed a partial tear back in 2014. Tanaka missed most of the second half of that season rehabbing, but the elbow has given him no trouble since. He has a 3.51 ERA (115 ERA+) in 205 1/3 innings since the injury.

“He’s not here to B.S. you and stuff like this,” Jones continued. “It’s pretty sweet. When they called, I’m not sure who I talked to first. I’m pretty sure I talked to everybody in the organization and their wives, but coach Ryan, man, he stood out. Because he basically said, ‘Hey, we don’t B.S. here. I told you we were going to get you and you were on the table when we had an opportunity to.’ Just the team meeting today and the things he said out there today to us let me know he demands excellence, but we’re going to have a great time doing it.”

Yadier Molina’s hitting has been an unexpected boost for Cardinals

Two months ago, the Cardinals had no idea they’d be getting all that. In fact, they had only a suspicion, not a certainty, that he would be their Opening Day catcher, much less an ironman who would be among their most consistent contact hitters.

Matheny said he thinks this is who Molina is as a hitter, while last season — in which Molina had his lowest OPS in nine seasons — was an aberration caused by weakness in his right thumb, which was injured in 2014. Molina had surgery on his left thumb twice last winter, the result of a September injury that he played through.

“It shows how much he was up against the wall last year, trying to make something work. Even though he’d been given the green light, he still didn’t have all the strength he wanted,” Matheny said. “When his body is right and he’s healthy, he has a great approach at the plate. He’s a very heady hitter.”

“He knows what he’s doing,” Leake said of Fryer. “It’s not like he’s a bad catcher. He thinks along, he’s got a grasp of pitching. It’s fun to have two catchers that are able to do that.”

Good luck trying to identify Virginia’s players at practice this spring. A numerical roster sheet won’t be of much help.

First-year Cavaliers coach Bronco Mendenhall is going to great lengths to establish a culture change in Charlottesville, and one of the first steps of that overhaul means stripping players of their jersey numbers.

New York Knicks president Phil Jackson met last week with former Pacers coach Frank Vogel, league sources have confirmed to ESPN.

Vogel is the second coach known to meet face-to-face with Jackson. Jackson and general manager Steve Mills also met with former Cavaliers coach David Blatt last month.

In addition to Blatt and Vogel, the Knicks are also considering interim coach Kurt Rambis for their opening.

Bonus footnote: The Patriots wore white at home throughout the 1985 regular season, but then they were forced to wear red on the road in two of their three playoff games (because the Jets chose to wear white at home in the wild-card round and the Dolphins did likewise in the conference championship). They won both of those games, so they chose to stick with red — their usual road color at the time — in Super Bowl XX.

A few other uni-related notes regarding the big game, all regarding the quarterbacks’ uniform numbers:

Panthers quarterback Cam Newton is poised to become the first quarterback to wear No. 1 in a Super Bowl. (Obviously, this also gives him the lowest uniform number ever worn by a Super Bowl quarterback.)